Merry package management days!

There are times that everyone seems to be interested in package management and usually we call this time “Christmas”. A single person gets the job of sending every child in the world more or less at the same time one or more presents – that sounds completely impossible. You know, there are even pseudo scientific studies that Chris Kringle would melt instantly in the try to travel fast enough… Yet alone, the production of all these presents at a single place hidden from the rest of the world. But is it really unrealistic? Linux has a marketshare under 1% and is therefore perfectly hidden for the majority of people. Debian provides more than 30.000 packages – more than any single person will ever need and such a number is by far not easy.
Many people are working on this, still, there is a single team responsible for the final shipment: The release team, unbelievable that this works out… the release team has only a single advantage: Debian has no predefined release day – debian releases then ready. 🙂

Anyway i am losing track, i want to say something completely different: I am personally not a big fan of this kind of “package management”. I mean, why do we need special days to exchange gifts? Don’t get me wrong, i love these days with the family and friends, but i am very happy that my family erased this strange requirement to get something for everyone as this generates only stress and even a whole new market-segment after Christmas which is happily served by eBay and co… (given that they even show ads regarding this each year after Christmas).

So, in conclusion, have fun with your family!
(And be sure to trust your package management, you know that there is only one ;))

P.S.: These days are the cause for my inactivity in any serious APT business but i will (hopefully) be back 2011, just in case you wonder…

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About DonKult

computer science student at the technical university of Darmstadt (Hesse, Germany, Europe, Earth) living in Erbach (Rheingau).
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